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Navigating your code with CodeDynamics

In this video, you will discover the multiple ways to easily navigate source code and learn how the code is constructed. With CodeDynamics, source code can be examined by using the files/function search object, “diving” in on a function, or searching directly in the file.

Learn more about additional features of CodeDynamics by viewing the video series which highlights the dynamic analysis and debugging features of the tool.

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Processes and threads view in CodeDynamics

CodeDynamics provides a central location for seeing the state of all your processes and threads. It allows you to simply change the Thread of Interest by double clicking, and modify how information is aggregated by turning on or off aggregation attributes. Watch and learn how to effectively use the processes and threads view in under five minutes.

Learn more about additional features of CodeDynamics by viewing the video series which highlights the dynamic analysis and debugging features of the tool.

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Reverse debugging on CodeDynamics with ReplayEngine

Join Rogue Wave senior director of product development, Bill Burns, as he highlights the dynamic analysis and debugging features of CodeDynamics in this video series.

In part 2, you will hear about the reverse debugging capabilities of CodeDynamics with ReplayEngine. ReplayEngine allows you step backwards and forwards in execution history, run backwards to breakpoints, and record files for later analysis. See a brief walk through of this unique feature that enables you to pinpoint and replay run-time issues for faster resolution.

Learn more about additional features of CodeDynamics in part 1 of this series – Introduction to CodeDynamics.
 

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Deterministically troubleshooting network distributed applications

Debugging is all about understanding what your software is really doing. Computers are unforgiving readers; they never pay attention to what you mean, and always insist on doing what the code says.

Debugging happens naturally when actively developing code and troubleshooting a problem. The same kind of investigation is also a great way to learn about programs that are working just fine. It pays to look closely at what programs are really doing when you re-introduce yourself to code that you wrote a long time ago, or when you try to understand a new bit of code that you encounter for the first time.

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