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Revealed: Automotive sector isn't cut out to secure connected cars

Cars rely very heavily on software. In fact, electronic components can add up to half of cars' manufacturing costs.

New research from Rogue Wave reveals 90 percent of software developers working in the automotive space think it’s difficult to truly secure cars, and over half don’t even think their company has the necessary training/technology.

This is all pointing towards an automotive security crisis.

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Automotive industry: Welcome to the software business

​Remember when a car was just a car? The automotive industry was all about how fast, how far, how safe, and how reliable their cars were. And, they got very good at it, having decades of expertise in developing and promoting safety standards and performance benchmarks to ensure the safety — and loyalty — of their customers.

Enter the connected car. Now, the automotive industry finds itself at a crossroads.

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Top automotive security vulnerabilities

Trying to build connected automotive software that’s both bulletproof and secure is a big task; knowing where to focus time and energy can be half the challenge. According to research conducted by CX3 Marketing on behalf of Rogue Wave Software, nearly 90 percent of all detected security holes can be traced back to just ten types of vulnerabilities.

In this paper we’ll explore the ten most common vulnerabilities for 2015, with examples from actual source code, and look at what changes can be made to coding style or processes to avoid them.

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Car cybersecurity: What do the automakers really think?

The Ponemon Institute recently conducted a cybersecurity survey sponsored by Rogue Wave Software and Security Innovation of over 500 automotive developers, engineers, and executives, primarily from automotive OEMs and tier one suppliers.

This paper analyzes the survey results, and provided new insights to help automotive software suppliers understand the current mindset of their developers and build security and safety into their software.
 

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Top 3 strategies to reduce risk in automotive / in-vehicle software development

Developing in-vehicle embedded applications is a safety, security, and quality challenge. Given that cars and trucks are increasingly connected to each other and to the devices around them, it’s becoming harder and harder to ensure that software is functional and free from risk. Development teams, especially the managers who are ultimately responsible, face incredible challenges when building such applications, and are learning that team members need to do more than just catch code defects during verification and validation testing. The new imperative: Identify and address security and compliance concerns earlier in the lifecycle, all while delivering innovative and differentiating features.

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Software as a process

Today’s software products are the result of many suppliers, vendors, open source repositories, and legacy code coming together in a mix of different processes, standards, and cultures. Each input offers a chance to introduce safety, security, or performance-related errors.

This paper explains the challenges of this polyglot environment and how strategies and tools proven in a number of industries can be applied to your organization to reduce defects, meet requirements, and minimize costs.

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