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Current visual data analysis techniques

The term visualization was first coined in the July 1987 Visualization in Scientific Computing (ViSC) report. The National Science Foundation defines it as “a method of computing that offers a way for seeing the unseen. It enriches the process of discovery and fosters profound and unexpected insights.” However, current visualization techniques, such as realistic rendering, are primarily geared to geometric sources of data such as CAD and two- and three-dimensional modeling sources.

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The value of visual data analysis

Decisions have to be made based on data that are voluminous, complex, and coming at a very rapid rate. The raw numbers, in records or tables, are overwhelming. That’s why many engineers and researchers are turning to visual data analysis (VDA) software, such as PV-WAVE, to better analyze their data. These tools combine state-of-the-art graphics, data access, data management, and analytical techniques into a highly interactive environment that can interpret large amounts of data quickly.

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VDA tool technology unleashed

For many PV-WAVE programmers, their exposure to VDA tools consists of running the navigator and using it as an interactive point-and-click method of accessing PV-WAVE functionality. This is the intention of the navigator certainly, but only one way of making use of the underlying technology. Some users also may invoke the individual VDA tools (Wz routines) interactively, such as with the command: "WzPlot, DIST(10)". This is another way of using VDA tools in an ad-hoc, interactive way.

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VDA tool technology

The VDA tool architecture is a framework for developing cross-platform applications with graphic user interfaces (GUIs) in PV-WAVE. It is intended to put the VDA tool architecture into context and position the PV-WAVE environment as a development tool.

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Winbond case study

Winbond Electronics chose PV-WAVE as a development tool for their engineering data analysis database. They can now speed up the processing of large amounts of data and graphics, improve the overall efficiency, meet the requirements of the company's e-strategy, and build a web-based user interface. They have improved efficiency of yield analysis and a reduction in the number of defective products.

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University of Goettingen

The photosphere of the Sun is the outer layer, which emits most of the radiation reaching the Earth. Inside the photosphere, however, energy is only partially transported by radiation. A substantial portion is carried by convective motions of a 6000 K hot ionized plasma in the rising volumes of granules with about 1000 km extension. The dark lanes, which separate the granular cells, are populated by small structures, some of them showing a magnetic signature as known from the dark sunspots. The high number density of these small magnetic flux-concentrations even over-compensates the strong magnetic field contained in the large-scale spots; that is why they carry the majority of the total magnetic flux of the Sun.

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PV-WAVE performance brochure

During the last several releases of PV-WAVE, there has been a concerted effort to enhance performance. For PV-WAVE versions from 8.0 to 9.0 we parallelized the majority of parallelizable array operations. In PV-WAVE 9.5 we introduced automatic thread control (ATC), an automatically-tuned runtime system that optimizes parallel performance. And for PV-WAVE 10.0, we enhanced ATC, and we parallelized most of the array operations that were still serial, most notably the multi-dimensional operations like subscripting, tiling, and concatenation.

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Semiconductor technical note

Yield analysts in the semiconductor industry face several challenges. Billions of dollars are invested in equipment for wafer fabrication and a rapid return on investment is critical to a semiconductor manufacturer. Rapid yield learning and yield enhancement is an important competitive advantage during the ramp-up stage of semiconductor production. To maintain productivity levels, the amount of time spent finding and correcting manufacturing problems must remain at least constant. Small improvements in yield, of tenths of a percent, can save the industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

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Material corrosion analysis through image processing

Two dimensional signals which represent images obtained from an electronic microscope are analyzed. These images are obtained from different types of metallic materials formed by diverse alloys. The metals contain degradation levels in the surface which have been exposed to corrosive environment conditions, in which different type of pittings are produced . These pittings are related to the material type and the corrosive media. The microscope images provide a great visual approach and allow the researcher to inspect the texture and the tonality of the surface. In other words the corrosion morphology and the pittings. The electronic microscope provides other characteristics in the pictures besides the approach. These characteristics are treated with signal processing techniques and models to extract the information that is not evident for the human eye and which accelerates the research procedures in the corrosion area.

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